To print the current date, we can utilize the datetime module. Dates are objects, like anything in Python. Datetime has several subclasses, which can be confusing at first.

Related course:

Date Example

We can use its method strftime() to change the format.
To show the current date (today):

import datetime
today = datetime.date.today()
print(today)

This will show the date in the format

YYYY-MM-DD

If you want another format, use the method strftime():

import datetime
today = datetime.date.today().strftime("%d-%m-%Y")
print(today)

This will output

DD-MM-YYYY

Get current time in Python

You can get the current time like this:

import datetime
currentTime = datetime.datetime.now().time()
print(currentTime)

To get the date and time, use:

import datetime
currentTime = datetime.datetime.now()
print(currentTime)

Format codes

When using the method strftime() we can specify the type of date format we want to show.
So which format codes do we have?

abstract-base-classes.md

%a  Locale’s abbreviated weekday name.
%A Locale’s full weekday name.
%b Locale’s abbreviated month name.
%B Locale’s full month name.
%c Locale’s appropriate date and time representation.
%d Day of the month as a decimal number [01,31].
%f Microsecond as a decimal number [0,999999], zero-padded on the left
%H Hour (24-hour clock) as a decimal number [00,23].
%I Hour (12-hour clock) as a decimal number [01,12].
%j Day of the year as a decimal number [001,366].
%m Month as a decimal number [01,12].
%M Minute as a decimal number [00,59].
%p Locale’s equivalent of either AM or PM.
%S Second as a decimal number [00,61].
%U Week number of the year (Sunday as the first day of the week)
%w Weekday as a decimal number [0(Sunday),6].
%W Week number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week)
%x Locale’s appropriate date representation.
%X Locale’s appropriate time representation.
%y Year without century as a decimal number [00,99].
%Y Year with century as a decimal number.
%z UTC offset in the form +HHMM or -HHMM.
%Z Time zone name (empty string if the object is naive).
%% A literal '%' character.